Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Patrimoine’ Category

Just found out that the annual wine festival is ON tomorrow in the Bouches-du-Rhone.

Lots of vineyards around Aix have tastings and special activities.  Good open-air activity if the weather holds.

Programme here:Dépliant-comité-13-2021

It’s not on their website so worth forwarding on to friends to enjoy the activities tomorrow?

Read Full Post »

If you are in Paris right now, you may have caught the unexpected sight of some of the 240 4m x 3m ads pasted in metro stations advertising the delights of Aix-en-Provence. There are two visuals, with the same strapline: La Provence a Un Prenomet Mon Prenom C’est Aix and here they are: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Eleven years.  That’s how long the Musée Arlaten has been closed for renovation but with the input of a leading architectural agency and the fabulous Arlesien designer Christian Lacroix, it certainly has style – just see the staircase.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Easter Sunday Mass was celebrated at ‘La grotte de Sainte-Baume’ at the weekend to formally re-open the cave of Saint Mary Magdalene after its being closed for 10 months’ work. (more…)

Read Full Post »

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Now that the long-plannned Musée Picasso will no longer be moving into the old College des Precheurs building, the town council has put it up for sale on the open market.  And opposition parties are asking for details of the terms and conditions of the sale. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Only just realised, after 18 years in Aix, that it’s actually someone’s job to clamber up narrow staircases and reach across the void inside the Tour de l’Horloge to manoeuvre the 4 statues round every 3 months when the season changes. (more…)

Read Full Post »

That was the question posed by women who gathered in the Place de Verdun on Sunday afternoon.  As has so often been noted, in the town there are just two streets bearing women’s names: Marie Curie and Irma Moreau, as well as the place Jeanne d’Arc.  Time for a change!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), La Montagne Sainte-Victoire, 1897

‘Parking anarchique’ was the story last week as the popular rambling destination, the Sainte-Victoire, was hit by a perfect storm of school holidays, inability to travel far, and daily curfews.  And there’s always the impending threat of a new confinement to trigger the well-we’d-better-go-now-before-another-lockdown response. (more…)

Read Full Post »

It was a snowy February in 1888, when Vincent Van Gogh left Paris to settle in Arles: he hoped to enjoy an idyll of colourful nature in the south, but brought with him his fascination for Japanese culture and its distinctive artistic style.

He couldn’t afford sitters so used to paint his neighbours; and it is a drawing of a young girl from Arles that is going on sale tomorrow at Christies in New York. ‘La Mousmé is’, he wrote to his brother Theo, ‘a Japanese girl – Provencal in this case’.

It’s expected to fetch 7-10 million dollars.

Also for sale, ‘Scene de rue a Montmartre‘ which he painted before leaving Paris. It has been owned by the same family since 1920 so not seen in public for a hundred years.  It goes on sale at Sotheby’s on March 25th.  Thanks to Julia for this info.

Vincent van Gogh’s Scène de rue à Montmartre/Montmartre Street Scene (Impasse des Deux Frères et le Moulin à Poivre) (February-April 1887) Courtesy of Sotheby’s/ArtDigital Studio

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »